a passage to india by e m forster

A Passage to India by E M Forster focuses on the intercultural communication of East and West throughout the novel. However, we also notice the failure of communication widely amongst colonisers and colonized.

The Bridge Party

As we look at the character of Mrs Turton, she is not interested in speaking to the Indians at the Bridge party. She perceived them as some inferiors. Mrs Turton is possessed with some sort of patronising sense. Her obsession with her status also halts her to communicate with the Indians. As compared to Mrs Turton, the Indian ladies are trying to find out their cultural association. These ladies were speaking in their limited vocabulary and knowledge. They mentioned the place names like Paris, Hyde Park Corner, etc.

At Callendar’s house

The failure of communication in A Passage to India by E M Forster can be seen at another point where Mrs Callendar and Mrs Lesley snubbed Aziz. It was after that that they took off with his tonga. Foster has mentioned it in the text as “glanced at the Indian and turned instinctively away”. It did not matter that how well appeared or well spoken the opposite person. On the basis of Aziz belong to an eastern background, both ladies did not initiate any communication with him.

Adela’s character in A Passage to India by E M Forster

The character of Adela is also very much keen to have a conversation with the ladies in the ‘bridge party’, but she was unable to get along with them. The failure of communication with the ladies on the basis of the English language as claimed by Adela seems null because as long as there is nothing to say to each other, there is nothing to produce.

Conclusively, all of these incidents within the text show us the presence of the failure of communication amongst the characters.

Follow us on Instagram.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *