literary analysis of the great gatsby

Literary analysis of The Great Gatsby Chapter 7 is about getting an insight into one of the most spectacular novels from the 20s. This novel by F. Scott. Fitzgerald did not get specific importance as it received after many years of its publication. 

About Author 

F. Scott. Fitzgerald was born in 1896 and died in 1940. He was a short story writer, essayist, novelist, and screenwriter. Scott was a dropout from Princeton University. His notable works are The Great Gatsby, Tender is the Night, Six tales of the Jazz Age, and The side of paradise. 

Literary Analysis of The Great Gatsby Chapter 8

On the next morning, Nick goes to Gatsby’s mansion and they have breakfast together. Jay tells him that Daisy never came outside last night. Nick suggests that Gatsby must leave Long Island and forget Daisy. Gatsby refuses to agree on both. Then, he describes all those scenes from his early relationship days with Daisy when he was startled by her wealth, her huge house, and the idea that every other man desires her. While Gatsby was with her, he pretended that he is just like all those wealthy and influential men. One night they spent time together and Jay got the feeling of being married to her. Right after that Gatsby had to go to World War One, though, Daisy waited for him, but soon she was over him and marries Tom Buchanan. 

The entire persona of Daisy was fascinating for Gatsby. Due to this, he converts his personality according to her and strives for money so that he could be a part of her class. It is crucial to know that old money were capable to avoid going into war, whereas, it was not the option for people like Gatsby. 

After finishing breakfast, Gatsby and Nick were walking outside when gardener tells him about emptying pool. Gatsby asks him not to do so as he has not used it entire summer and would like to use it now. While going out, Nick points out to Gatsby that his worth is more than that rotten crowd put together. Gatsby smiled over this compliment. 

Nick was never in the favour of how Gatsby is living his life. Still, he respect his dreams and called all those as rotten tomatoes because they have used him for his money. 

Nick falls asleep in the office that day. He wakes up when Jordan calls him and they were caught into an argument. One of them shuts down the phone and Nick did not give a damn about it. After last night, Nick was sure that he does not want any sort of connections with Tom and Daisy.

Later, Nick is connecting dots with what happened after Myrtle’s death. Wilson was broken after her death and talks about her the whole night with Michaelis. He tells him about her lover and has doubt that driver of that car was her lover because she ran towards him. He further tells that he forbid her about committing this sin and not fooling into God’s eyes. By that time, the sun was rising and Wilson stares into the eyes of T.J. Eckleburg. In his mind, he was sure whom to ask about Myrtle’s murderer. That morning, he was not present at the garage.

Wilson’s dream were no more since Myrtle was dead. The tension between old and new money was once again building. 

Gatsby went for swimming at two. He asked his house help to let him know if there is any phone call. There was nothing. 

In the evening, Nick along with some Wolfsheim’s man found Gatsby dead in the pool. He was shot by someone.

Nearby in the grass, Wilson’s dead body was also present.

There is Roaring Twenties to be blame or what? The pride of old money ruined all the relationships, Gatsby and Daisy, Wilson and Myrtle, Nick and Jordan, Tom and Myrtle. In the end, only old money was there. Daisy goes back to Tom.

 

 

 

 

  • Literary Analysis of themes in Frost at Midnight

    About the Poet Before looking at the literary analysis of themes in Frost at Midnight, it is important to look at the poet’s introduction. Samuel Taylor Coleridge was born in Devon, England in 1772. He was a literary critic, poet, and philosopher of English language. Coleridge along with William Wordsworth began Romantic Movement in England. […]

  • Literary analysis of themes in Devil on the Cross

    Literary Analysis of themes in Devil on the Cross Good vs Evil When we look at the literary analysis of themes in Devil on the Cross, it is notable that throughout the novel, there is a war going on between good and evil. The conflict is happening between God and the people on earth. All […]

  • Summary of As I Walked Out One Evening

    As I Walked Out One Evening is a poem by English poet Wystan Hugh Auden. The summary of As I Walked out one Evening is looking at the poem at a glance where the speaker is only speaking about love. He is feeling that love around him through his eyes. About the Poet  Auden was […]

  • Summary of Mr Bleaney

    Mr Bleaney is written by Philip Larkins in 1955. The summary of Mr. Bleaney gives an overview of the contents and story of the poem.  About the Poet  Larkin was born in 1922 in Coventry, England. He completed his BA degree from St. John’s College where he was friends with Kingsley Amis. Later, he chose […]

  • Literary analysis of The Great Gatsby Chapter 9

    Literary analysis of The Great Gatsby Chapter 7 is about getting an insight into one of the most spectacular novels from the 20s. This novel by F. Scott. Fitzgerald did not get specific importance as it received after many years of its publication.  About Author  F. Scott. Fitzgerald was born in 1896 and died in 1940. […]

  • Literary analysis of The Great Gatsby Chapter 8

    Literary analysis of The Great Gatsby Chapter 7 is about getting an insight into one of the most spectacular novels from the 20s. This novel by F. Scott. Fitzgerald did not get specific importance as it received after many years of its publication.  About Author  F. Scott. Fitzgerald was born in 1896 and died in 1940. […]

By WordFuss

Word Fuss brings in the best solutions to your literary equations. We cater all the literature geeks with the latest news of English Literary World.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published.

PHP Code Snippets Powered By : XYZScripts.com